LIGO records an unknown gravitational wave explosion.

According tomedia reports, the Earth’s gravitational wave observatory recently discovered something strange. The Laser Interference Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Virg probe are reported to have recorded an unknown or unexpected “explosion” of gravitational waves on January 14. So far, gravitational waves detected by humans have been often associated with extreme cosmic events, such as the collision of two black holes or the merger of neutron stars after falling into a vortex of death. Gravitational waves have never been detected before the eruption, and scientists speculate that this may be related to phenomena such as supernovae or gamma-ray bursts.

LIGO records an unknown gravitational wave explosion.

Recently, scientists accidentally reaped the results of such an explosion, they named it S200114f. The astronomical event was detected by software that helped detect gravitational waves for the first time.

Back in the day, astronomers were actually able to determine the source of the explosion — Betelgeuse. And recent analysis suggests that Betelgeuse behaves strangely, with astronomers speculating that it could be a spectacular explosion. Such an explosion is predicted to trigger a gravitational wave explosion.

But Andy Howell, an astronomer at the Ras Queanbeyan Observatory, said the red star was fortunate for Betelgeuse that it was safe. No doubt this is a pity for those who see a star explode.

LIGO records an unknown gravitational wave explosion.