HP plans to change low-cost printer sales model that makes money from late-stage consumables consumption

For a long time, the printer industry has been implementing the “low-cost selling machines, high-priced raw supplies to make a profit” sales model. While the move has made some manufacturers profitable, it has also distorted the market and people’s spending habits. Take the extreme example: when using up a set of original consumables (such as inkjet printer cartridges), some users would rather buy a machine again than buy expensive supplies alone — because the price of both may even be upside down.

HP plans to change low-cost printer sales model that makes money from late-stage consumables consumption

HP OfficeJet all-in-one, Amazon only sells for $60 (via TechSpot)

In fact, as early as the early 2000s, there were some manufacturers at the exhibition to promote the “customized” supply scheme. It bypasses traditional printer cartridges and extends the pipeline to a larger CMYK cartridge.

Of course, such sales strategies are not limited to the printer industry. The razor industry is also more willing to offer the handle at a low price and then sell expensive blade supplies to consumers. The good news is that this malformed sales strategy is expected to ease in the future.

HP plans to change low-cost printer sales model that makes money from late-stage consumables consumption

(Losing money to drink, life is not good)

HP is considering abandoning the sales model, according to a recent Morgan Stanley study. Because only 20% of customers buy original supplies, it’s not enough to make a profit.

The bad news is that the initial acquisition cost of printer hardware may rise as a result. For many, it may be time to adopt a more sensible purchasing strategy.

Finally, with the popularity of smartphones and the mobile Internet, the demand for color inkjet printers has been greatly reduced. Instant lying occasionally necessary, or as a matter of urgency through a black-and-white laser printer (color laser printers are still relatively expensive).