Researchers have developed a living brick that replicates, self-repairs and absorbs CO2

Researchers have discovered a way to make living bricks that convert CO2 into CaCO3, the main component of cement,media reported. Studies of cyanobacteria show that when combining sand, CO2 and a specific range of humidity conditions, cyanobacteria have great potential in future construction projects. The resulting bricks will be self-healing and copyable.

Researchers have developed a living brick that replicates, self-repairs and absorbs CO2

It is understood that this process begins when the colonies are inoculated into the sand and gelatin solution, and then lets it absorb CO2 to generate CaCO3, so that gelatin mineralization and thus the sand solidifies. “We use bacteria to help grow building materials,” said Will Srubar, an assistant professor at the School of Civil, Environment and Construction Engineering (CEAE) at the University of Colorado in Boulder. “

Researchers have developed a living brick that replicates, self-repairs and absorbs CO2

It’s like they built a sandcastle with water, but the resulting material isn’t as easy to break. These bricks are as rough and hard as most modern mortars used by construction workers in our city every day. At the same time, these bricks can also be copied, i.e. brick material smanufactures brick material.

Researchers have developed a living brick that replicates, self-repairs and absorbs CO2

“We know that bacteria are growing exponentially, so instead of making bricks one by one, it’s better to make a brick and break it into two, four, and more,” says Srubar. This will not only completely change the way we think about structural materials, but also the way we make structural materials on an exponential scale. “