It’s not just G1 and G2: The Supermassive Black Hole A- has discovered four more similar mysterious objects

At the center of the Milky Way, there is a giant black hole four million times the mass of the sun — Sagittarius A, or Sgr A. Over the past decade, scientists have discovered two strange objects around the black hole that appear to be orbiting the black hole, later known as G1 and G2.

It's not just G1 and G2: The Supermassive Black Hole A- has discovered four more similar mysterious objects

The nature of these “G sources” is currently disputed in the scientific community. Some astronomers think they are gas clouds, while others think it’s more like a strange star shrouded in dust. And according to a new study, scientists have discovered four other mysterious objects that are very similar to G1 and G2, suggesting they may be members of a new cosmic phenomenon.

It's not just G1 and G2: The Supermassive Black Hole A- has discovered four more similar mysterious objects

It's not just G1 and G2: The Supermassive Black Hole A- has discovered four more similar mysterious objects

It's not just G1 and G2: The Supermassive Black Hole A- has discovered four more similar mysterious objects

It's not just G1 and G2: The Supermassive Black Hole A- has discovered four more similar mysterious objects

“These mysterious objects look like gases, but they act like stars,” said Andrea Ghez, an astronomer at the University of California, Los Angeles and co-author of the new study. The paper was published Wednesday in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

Based on Osiris imager (W.M. installed in Hawaii. The team studied these mysterious objects more closely, using near-infrared data collected by the Keckecky Observatory over the past 13 years. Gaze speculated that what astronomers saw was not a cloud of gas, but rather the product of two stars that merged after two orbiting stars collided and formed a single large-mass star.

But this hypothesis is based on only G1 and G2 objects, but now scientists have discovered four more similar objects, which means it is more difficult to solve the problem. “I think only G1 and G2 can make the assumption that the gas flow photolayer works well, but it’s hard to circle the hypothesis that only six objects orbit around at different angles,” said Anna Ciurlo, an astronomer at the University of California, Los Angeles. “