All 43 electric cars in the U.S. can’t sell for a Tesla in 2019

Tesla (TSLA.US) has made a beautiful comeback in 2019, with its share price up more than 200 percent, and now that both traditional car companies and new energy vehicle companies are adding electric cars, Tesla is playing the role of “fish” in China, what kind of existence is it in the United States?

Not only has China increased its investment in new energy vehicles in the past few years, but the U.S. has not been far behind, with only nine all-electric vehicles on the market in the U.S. in 2012 and 46 by 2019. Sales of electric cars in 2012 were just 52,607, and by 2019 it had grown to 329,266, a more than fivefold increase in just seven years. It looks like the U.S. electric car market is expanding a lot, but the gains are mostly contributed by Tesla, which sells only three models in the U.S., the Model S, 3, And X.

All 43 electric cars in the U.S. can't sell for a Tesla in 2019

In 2012, Tesla sold only model S, which sold 2,650 cars that year, and sold 192,250 models by 2019, a more than 72-fold increase.

Non-Tesla trams have also seen significant growth in both models and sales over the past seven years, but they are still no match for Tesla. In 2019, 137,016 non-Tesla-branded electric cars were sold in the U.S., with Tesla accounting for 58 percent of the market.

All 43 electric cars in the U.S. can't sell for a Tesla in 2019

Then combine the above two indicators. Divide Tesla’s annual sales in the U.S. market by Tesla’s existing models and get average sales per model. Obviously, every model Tesla has produced so far has been a hit. Last year, the average sales of Tesla’s three models were 64,083 (not to note that the Model 3 still accounted for the majority, with 158,925 last year). However, none of the three models sold less than 14,000.

All 43 electric cars in the U.S. can't sell for a Tesla in 2019

So how are non-Tesla brands doing? The average tram sales for other brands were 6,245 in 2012, compared with 3,186 last year, suggesting that while the U.S. electric car market is expanding, it is more about model selection, with actual sales of each model less than in 2012.

All 43 electric cars in the U.S. can't sell for a Tesla in 2019

If that data doesn’t yet reflect the awkward situation of U.S. electric car brands, the following statistics estimate that many people will be surprised.

So far, only two electric cars have sold more than 30,000 cars a year in the U.S. market, and Tesla’s Model 3 is certainly one of them, and the other model is not a 19-year, 18-year, 17-year, 16-year-old, or even 15-year-old product, but a Nissan Leaf from the 2014 model year. That year it sold 30,200 cars in the U.S. market, and as a 100% electric car, he had a range of only 84 miles! But in the next five years, none of the models except Tesla sold more than it did in years.

All 43 electric cars in the U.S. can't sell for a Tesla in 2019

The highest-selling non-Tesla model in 2019 is the Toyota Prius Prime, which sold 23,630 vehicles, but it’s a hybrid, not an electric car, and the second-best-selling Chevrolet Bolt, an all-electric car, is only 16. 418, not half of the 14-year-old Nissan Leaf.

All 43 electric cars in the U.S. can't sell for a Tesla in 2019

So the U.S. electric car market has certainly grown over the past few years, but it’s not a one-off, with Tesla contributing at least half of its boom. In December alone, model 3 sold more than 27,000 vehicles in the U.S., according to InsideEVs, while other brands of electric cars sold out for a full year.

The current situation is really, in the U.S. electric car market only two brands, Tesla and others!