Like water droplets, crystal-bright NASA unveils 200 million light-years away from the galaxy

NASA recently released a picture on its official website taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, a bright object similar to a dropin called NGC 1803. It is about 200 million light-years away and is located in the constellation of the South Half-Day Ball, the painted frame. “NGC 1803” was discovered in 1834 by astronomer John Herschel.

Like water droplets, crystal-bright NASA unveils 200 million light-years away from the galaxy

“NGC 1803” Galaxy Photos Published on NASA’s Official Website

Herschel was an important figure in astronomy. John, his father William and his aunt Caroline have all made great contributions to this field, and their research is still applicable to this day.

William systematically recorded many objects he saw in the night sky, named many satellites in the solar system, and found infrared radiation. Caroline discovered several comets and nebulae. John modified the list of celestial bodies mentioned above and extended it to his Nebula and Cluster Smicpros. This is the predecessor of John Louis Emile Dreher’s New General Table of Nebula and Clusters, a catalogue of deep space objects that astronomers still use today.

The NGC 1803 galaxy is one of a pair of galaxies. Dreher described it as “weak, small, round”, located in the south-east, near a very bright star. The star is actually a nebula-like lens galaxy called “PGC 16720” and is not visible in this image.