Ultra-fast camera pCUP captures images of transparent objects at 1 trillion fps

Scientists at the California Institute of Technology have developed an ultra-fast camera that can capture 1 trillion frames of transparent objects per second,media reported. A decade ago, Cambridge University invented a new ultra-fast camera called Photosensitive Compression Ultrafast Photography (pCUP) that captures slow-motion light. The camera is very fast, not only to capture video of transparent objects, but also to capture short-lived objects such as shock waves, and possibly through neuronal signals.

Ultra-fast camera pCUP captures images of transparent objects at 1 trillion fps

This type of microscopy is designed to improve imaging of most transparent objects, such as cells. The rapid imaging section of the system uses a lossless coding compression ultra-fast technology called LLE-CUP. The technology captures all the movements that occur during the completion of the shot by taking only one photo.

LLE-CUP captures the motion of light in just one shot, something traditional technology can’t do. In the test, the team used the technique to demonstrate pCUP by imaging the propagation of a shock wave in water and a laser pulse in a crystalline material.

Although the technology is still in its early stages, it may play a role in a number of areas, including physics, biology or chemistry. The technology allows scientists to see the communication between neurons in real time. The technology could also allow scientists to see how flames travel in the combustion chamber.