NASA bids farewell to Spitzer Space Telescope after 16 years

For more than a decade, NASA has been using the Spitzer Space Telescope to study space. NASA is now ready to retire Spitzer and celebrate the Spitzer telescope’s 16-year successful mission. NASA will hold a live program on Wednesday, January 22, at 10 a.m. Pacific Standard Time to celebrate Spitzer’s retirement.

The event will be broadcast live on NASA TV, Facebook Live, Ustream, YouTube, Twitter and NASA. The program will invite experts from Spitzer’s program, and the public can use the hashtag askNASA or ask questions in the comments section of NASA’s Facebook and YouTube pages.

Spitzer is one of the four observatories NASA uses to study various celestial bodies. Launched on August 25, 2003, the space telescope has been studying the universe in infrared light since its launch. Spitzer was used to conduct some of the earliest studies of the atmosphere of exoplanets.

It was also used to identify two exoplanets and found five of the seven Earth-sized exoplanets around Trappist I. Spitzer will retire on Thursday, January 30. The Spitzer space operation is being conducted by Lockheed Martin Space in Littleton, Colorado. JPL is responsible for managing Spitzer’s mission in Washington. The science operation is managed by the Spitzer Center for Science at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. The data is archived at the Infrared Science Archives of California Institute of Technology IPAC.

NASA bids farewell to Spitzer Space Telescope after 16 years