After the final update of Windows 7, some users encountered the problem of blacking the wallpaper screen.

On January 14, Microsoft released the final batch of security and non-critical updates to the Windows 7 operating system. However, many users responded on Reddit and Microsoft’s official forums that Windows 7 KB4534310 introduced a strange bug that caused desktop wallpapers to be replaced with black screens. Some hapless users said that after each reboot, the desktop background will revert to pure black.

After the final update of Windows 7, some users encountered the problem of blacking the wallpaper screen.

(Instagram via Windows Latest)

If you’ve ever had a system activation problem, you’ll never be unfamiliar with such a black screen interface.

Typically, when the Microsoft activation server thinks the PC is out of date, or uses an illegal product key, it gives the user a black screen wallpaper prompt.

Curiously, some Windows 10 users reported the same problem, suggesting that there was a greater correlation between the incident and Microsoft’s activation server.

One user wrote: “Although I’ve had the same problem, not all images are affected.”

My main monitor is 1920 x 1080 resolution, and the 2560 x 1440 wallpaper does n’ up, but 1920 x 1200 does.

I didn’t go deep into the resolution settings, but the fact that the image position above 2560 x 1440 is different (it is set to Stretch).

One way for users to avoid this bug is to uninstall the critical KB4534310 or KB4534314 security updates.

Another user said: ‘All of our laptops or desktop PCs running Windows 7 are affected. All users have joined a specific domain for extended support.

If you’re having problems with wallpaper sms turning black after you deploy a patch, try different resolution wallpapers before uninstalling updates.

Finally, some users also experienced problems when installing KB4534310. At the time of writing, more than 180 users have confirmed this on Microsoft forums. Unfortunately, Microsoft doesn’t seem to be aware of these issues.