Scientists develop new composite food packaging film that kills bacteria

Recently, some researchers have developed experimental antimicrobial food packaging films that can replace traditional polyethylene. And now scientists have developed a composite food packaging film. The polyethylene films we often use are robust, transparent, breathable and waterproof. However, it can’t kill bacteria, which is why scientists developed the new material.

Scientists develop new composite food packaging film that kills bacteria

The composite food packaging film was created by a team at Pennsylvania State University and is mixed with a polysaccharide polymer called Pruland polysaccharides, which is incorporated into an antibacterial agent called the arginine of laurel acid. Branched starches and phonic acid arginine have been approved for use in food.

The researchers first coated the side of the traditional polyethylene film with a mixture. Making it adhesion requires changing both the branch starch and the plastic, as polyethylene is usually hydrophobic. They then used the resulting composite sheets (coated inwards) for vacuum-packed raw beef, raw chicken breasts and ready-to-eat turkey breast. All meat samples have been pre-inoculated with toxic E. coli, salmonella, mononucleosis growth listeria and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. After keeping the samples refrigerated for 28 days, the researchers found a significant reduction in the number of bacteria.

Scientists develop new composite food packaging film that kills bacteria

Lead scientist Professor Catherine Catherine said: “This new composite film not only provides us with antibacterial properties, but also the strength of polyethylene and all other ideal properties that the industry is still looking for.” “

The study was described in a recent paper published in the International Journal of Food Microbiology.