Why do the three browser development teams always give each other cakes? It’s a long history

While Microsoft, Google and Mozilla are competing fiercely in the browser market, this doesnot prevent the deep friendship between the IE/Edge, Chrome and Firefox development teams. Microsoft’s decision to abandon the classic Edge and move to the open-source Chromium engine also means it has a closer relationship with Google. For users, the collaboration between enterprises also contributes to the rapid development of the browser engine.

Why do the three browser development teams always give each other cakes? History is a long time away.

(Image via Softpedia)

While the frequency of sending cakes is not high, as a fine tradition of the Microsoft-Google-Mozilla trio, the news has made headlines in the media and social networks every time, especially when a new version of the browser is released.

Earlier this month, Microsoft reached a new milestone — releasing a new version of the Microsoft Edge browser based on the Chromium kernel.

Why do the three browser development teams always give each other cakes? History is a long time away.

As you might expect, Mozilla and Google were no surprise in congratulating the software giant’s browser development team.

Back in the day, you’ll find that this tradition began with Microsoft in 2006. Mozilla Firefox was just getting started, and the software giant thought it was a good time to congratulate its emerging competitors when it came to the launch of Version 2.

Why do the three browser development teams always give each other cakes? History is a long time away.

Shortly after Firefox 2 opened its download, the IE team sent Mozilla a piece of cake with the book, “Congratulations on the release, love your IE team.” Every major release that followed, Microsoft engineers didn’t forget the fine tradition.

But with Mozilla set a six-week release cycle, Microsoft engineers eventually decided to switch to more affordable cupcakes to avoid Firefox development engineers getting tired of it any time soon.

Why do the three browser development teams always give each other cakes? History is a long time away.

After the microsoft IE 10 launch, Mozilla also sent Microsoft a piece of cake in 2012 to show its support again. It reads: “Congratulations to IE 10, love your Mozilla team.” And there’s a huge Firefox logo on the surface.

Since then, Microsoft and Mozilla have left a tradition of exchanging cakes (congratulations on the release of the larger version). Then, in 2015, the Google Chrome team joined the long-established revelry.

Why do the three browser development teams always give each other cakes? History is a long time away.

That year, the Redmond-based software giant finalized a new Microsoft Edge browser, formerly known as Project Spartan. As the default browser for Windows 10 bundled installations, it is designed to replace older IEs.

Google took the opportunity to send delicious wishes to the Microsoft team and wrote on the cake: “Congratulations on the launch, Chrome team respect.”

Microsoft Edge, based on the Chromium kernel, now updates the browser every six weeks. As for Google itself, there are also segments of the Daily Fast and Faster Canary and The Dev Update Channel, which is tweeted every Monday.

The bigger question is that Mozilla Firefox has been further shortened to every four weeks, wondering whether Microsoft and Google intend to swap cupcakes for a more appropriate dessert in the future.