Chinese new coronavirus prevention and control guidelines released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The outbreak of the new coronavirus pneumonia in Wuhan, China, has attracted worldwide attention – and has become almost the only topic of conversation during the Chinese Spring Festival. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today released Chinese version of the Interim Guide to Preventing the Spread of the New Coronary Virus (2019-nCoV) to Others in Families and Communities, which may also be helpful to people who may be living in the United States.

Chinese new coronavirus prevention and control guidelines released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Here’s the full text:

This interim guide is based on what is currently known about the spread of respiratory infections of the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) and other viruses in 2019. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will update this interim guidelines as needed and as we get more information.

Coronary viruses are a large group of viruses, some of which can cause disease in humans, while others can spread between animals, including camels, cats and bats. In rare cases, animal coronaviruses can evolve and infect humans and then spread among people, as seen in Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The possibility of human transmission at 2019-nCoV is unclear. The following interim guidelines may help prevent the spread of the virus among families and communities.

This interim guide applies to the following situations:

The patient has been diagnosed with the 2019-nCoV infection, but does not require hospitalization and can be treated at home

Patients are being assessed for 2019-nCoV infection by medical staff who do not require hospitalization and can be treated at home

Caregivers and family members of patients who have been diagnosed with 2019-nCoV infection or are being assessed for 2019-nCoV infection

Other people in close contact with patients who have been diagnosed with the 2019-nCoV infection or are being assessed for the 2019-nCoV infection

Precautions for treatment at home for patients who have been diagnosed with 2019-nCoV infection or are being evaluated for 2019-nCoV infection

Your doctor and public health staff will assess whether you can be treated at home. If it is determined that you can be isolated at home, you will be monitored by local or state health officials. You should follow the following precautions until your medical staff or local or state health authorities inform you that you can resume normal activity.

Please stay at home except for medical care

In addition to medical care, you should limit your out-of-home activities. Do not go to work, school or to public places, and do not use public transport or taxis.

Isolating yourself from others in your family

You should try to stay in a different room from the rest of your family. In addition, you should use a separate restroom, if any.

Please call your doctor before going to the doctor

Before you make an appointment, call your medical staff and tell them that you have a 2019-nCoV infection or are being evaluated for the 2019-nCoV infection. This will help the clinic of the medical staff to take measures to protect others from infection.

Wearing a mask

You should wear a mask when you are in the same room as someone else and when you visit a medical staff. If you can’t wear a mask, the person you live with should wear a mask when you’re in the same room as you.

Block ingering from coughing and sneezing

When you cough or sneeze, apply a paper towel to cover your mouth and nose, or your sleeve when coughing or sneezing. Throw used paper towels into a trash can with plastic bags and wash your hands immediately with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Hand washing

Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If there is no soap and water, and your hands are not significantly dirty, use an alcoholic hand disinfectant. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid sharing household items

You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, cutlery, towels, bedding or other items with others in your family. After using these items, apply soap and water to thoroughly clean them.

Monitor your symptoms

If your condition worsens (e.g. breathing difficulties), seek medical attention immediately. Before you make an appointment, call your medical staff and tell them that you have a 2019-nCoV infection or are being evaluated for the 2019-nCoV infection. This will help the clinic of the medical staff to take measures to protect others from infection. Ask your medical staff to call your local or state health department.

Precautions for caregivers and family members

If you live or care for a patient who has been diagnosed with the 2019-nCoV infection or who is being evaluated for the 2019-nCoV infection, you should:

Make sure that you understand and help patients follow the medicationand and treatment instructions of medical personnel. You should help patients get basic home needs and support the purchase of groceries, prescription drugs, and other personal needs.

The family only needs to leave someone who provides the necessary care for the patient.

Other family members should remain in other places of residence or place of residence. If this is not possible, they should stay in another room or isolate as much as possible from the patient. If possible, use a separate restroom;

Restrict the unnecessary guests from coming to the house;

Avoid approaching patients in the elderly and people with compromised immune systems or chronic health conditions. These include patients with chronic heart disease, lung or kidney disease, and diabetes.

Make sure that shared spaces in your home are well ventilated, such as using air conditioning or opening windows if weather permits.

Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If there is no soap and water, and your hands are not significantly dirty, use an alcoholic hand disinfectant. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

Wear disposable masks, protective clothing and gloves when touching or touching the patient’s blood, body fluids and/or secretions (such as sweat, saliva, sputum, nasal mucus, vomit, urine, or diarrhea).

Discard disposable masks, protective clothing and gloves after use. Do not reuse.

Wash your hands immediately after removing your mask, protective clothing and gloves.

Avoid sharing household items. You should not share dishes, water cups, cups, cutlery, towels, bedding or other items with patients who have been diagnosed with 2019-nCoV infection or are being assessed for 2019-nCoV infection. After the patient has used these items, they should be thoroughly cleaned (see “Thorough cleaning of clothing” below).

Clean all surfaces of “high-frequency contact” surfaces daily, such as counters, desks, door handles, toilet fixtures, toilets, mobile phones, keyboards, tablets and bedside tables. In addition, clean any surface that may carry blood, body fluids and/or secretions or excreta.

Read the labels for cleaning products and follow the recommendations provided on the product labels. The label contains instructions for the safe and effective use of the cleaning product, including precautions you should take when using the appliance, such as wearing gloves or aprons, and ensuring good ventilation during use of the appliance.

Use diluted bleach or labelhousehold disinfectants labeled “EPA-Approved.” When preparing bleach at home, add 1 tablespoon of bleach to 1 quart (4 cups) of water. For more bleach, add 1/4 cup of bleach to 1 gallon (16 cups) of water.

Wash your clothes thoroughly.

Remove and wash immediately clothing or bedding with blood, body fluids and/or secretions or excreta.

Disposable gloves should be worn when handling contaminated items. Wash your hands immediately after you take off your gloves.

Read and follow the instructions on the laundry or laundry and detergent labels. In general, wash and dry the clothes at the maximum temperature recommended on the clothing label.

Put all used disposable gloves, protective clothing, masks and other contaminated items in containers with plastic bags before placing them in other household waste. Wash your hands immediately after handling these items.

Monitor the patient’s symptoms. If the patient’s condition is more serious, call their medical staff and tell them that the patient has a 2019-nCoV infection or is being evaluated for the 2019-nCoV infection. This will help the clinic of the medical staff to take measures to protect others from infection. Ask a medical personto to call your local or state health department.

Caregivers and family members who are in close contact with patients who have been diagnosed with the 2019-nCoV infection or are undergoing an assessment of the 2019-nCoV infection are considered “close contacts” if preventive measures are not followed and their health status should be monitored. Follow the precautions for close contacts below.

Discuss any other issues with your state or local health department.

Precautions for close contacts

If you have close contact with a patient who has been diagnosed with a 2019-nCoV infection or who is being evaluated for the 2019-nCoV infection, you should:

Monitor your health from the day of your first close contact with the patient and continue to monitor your health for 14 days after your last close contact with the patient. Observe these signs and symptoms:

Fever. Measure your body temperature twice a day.

Cough.

Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.

Other early symptoms that require attention include chills, body pain, sore throat, headache, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, and runny nose.

If you develop fever or any of these symptoms, call your health care provider immediately.

Before you make an appointment, be sure to tell your medical staff that you have close contact with a patient who has been diagnosed with the 2019-nCoV infection or is being evaluated for the 2019-nCoV infection. This will help the clinic of the medical staff to take measures to protect others from infection. Ask your medical staff to call your local or state health department.

If you don’t have any symptoms, you can continue with daily activities, such as going to work, school, or other public places.