Rats with severe brain damage are found to be able to live a normal life

A scientist scanning the brain of an elderly mouse found that the normally mobile mouse had a severely damaged brain. The mice, known as R222, had symptoms of hydrocephalus, and the brain function of the hydrocephalus site was redirected to parts that were not occupied by liquid. This ability, known as neuroplasticity, is a widely documented but extremely rare phenomenon.

In R222, for example, its visual output processing, smell and touch are dispersed to other parts of the brain.

At first glance, R222 may seem like it doesn’t have a brain, but it acts as usual, and scientists call it a “miracle of nature.” The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.                     

Rats with severe brain damage are found to be able to live a normal life