Facebook Content Oversight Committee Plan: The Power to Veto Zuckerberg’s Comments

Facebook on Tuesday made recommendations on how the independent content oversight committee would work and announced that a former head of human rights organizations would lead the commission’s management. The Facebook Content Complaints Board will be expanded to about 40 members and has the power to veto comments from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. The content on social media platforms such as Facebook and Instagram has been the most controversial in the past.

Facebook Content Oversight Committee Plan: The Power to Veto Zuckerberg's Comments

Facebook Content Oversight Committee Plan: The Power to Veto Zuckerberg's Comments

Facebook will announce its membership later in 2020. But the company announced this week that Thomas Hughes, a former executive director of the free speech rights group Article 19, would serve as the executive director of the oversight committee. The commission’s original offices will be located in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Brent Harris, Facebook’s head of corporate governance and global affairs, said the company had narrowed its membership to a few dozen people, but had not yet made a formal invitation. Facebook hopes the commission will be operational by the summer. The Committee will also provide recommendations for policy changes.

Facebook is in the spotlight ahead of November’s U.S. presidential election. Earlier, U.S. intelligence agencies said Facebook’s social media platform was used by Russia to influence the 2016 U.S. election. Russia, however, denies the allegations.

In December, Facebook pledged $130 million over about six years.

Cases reviewed by the committee can come from Facebook or from users. The proposed charter shows that the committee decided that Facebook would take action for a period of 90 days. In cases that could have “urgent and realistic consequences”, the review will be completed within 30 days.