Google Area 120 Incubating Tangi Short Video App Focuses on DIY and Creativity

Google’s in-house incubator, Area 120, has just launched a new project called Tangi. It aims to attract creativity and DIY content in the form of short videos. Unlike entertainment-oriented apps such as TikTok or the new Byte, Tangi is designed to help people learn. It was originally logged on to the web and iOS platforms, where fun videos were shared on themes of creation, painting, cooking, fashion, beauty and more.

Google Area 120 Incubating Tangi Short Video App Focuses on DIY and Creativity

(Screenshot from: Tangi)

“Tangi focuses only on DIY and creative content, with the goal of helping people learn to craft, cook and create in less than a minute of video,” explains Coco Mao, founder of Tangi.

In other words, Tangi is designed to make it easier for users to find many high-quality getting started videos. Coco Mao is understood to have been inspired to build Tangi after returning home to visit his parents.

Google Area 120 Incubating Tangi Short Video App Focuses on DIY and Creativity

She found that parents had been staring at introductory tutorials on painting and photography on their phones, even though they had encountered some challenges with their smartphone use. Coco Mao means:

I found my mother to have been creative and, even more surprisingly, the niche community, which provided quick guidance, and now she has become a business oil painter.

I’ve also joined some vibrant creative communities that make videos about cooking and fashion, and I’ve noticed some amazing things in it.

Content that used to take a long time to learn through text and images can now be easily acquired through short videos.

Although Tangi’s vertical-screen video can be up to one minute, it averages only about 45 seconds, meaning the platform doesn’t have to compete directly with long videos on large video sites such as YouTube.

Google Area 120 Incubating Tangi Short Video App Focuses on DIY and Creativity

Getting rid of the recipe introduction, Tangi’s short video selves the essence, showcases quick cooking techniques, or inspires users to try new ideas in the kitchen.

Another difference with other short video apps is that Tangi includes a feature called Try It.

As a way to interact with other members of the community, Tangi encourages users to upload photos they’re trying and to comment positively.

Tangi has been used by a number of creators, including DIY and lifestyle blogger Holly Grace, portrait artist Rachel Faye Carter, food baker Paola D Yee, beauty blogger SewWigged Out, artisan DIYer TheArtGe and DIY cook Jonathan Blogs and others.

Tangi isn’t yet open to video uploads to everyone, but instead creators need to apply to be part of the video platform, which may be a good way to ensure that video content stays focused on DIY and creativity.