New discovery by researchers brings record amount of drinking water from thin air

According tomedia, clean water is all around us — it floats in the air most of the time. Of course, this form of water is not particularly suitable for drinking, but now researchers from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) have discovered materials that can collect large amounts of water from the air.

New discovery by researchers brings record amount of drinking water from thin air

It is understood that the key to this system is a material called metal-organic structure (MOF). This structure has the largest surface area of any known material — in fact, if you can expand a 1 gram of MOF, it will cover a football field enough. All this interior space makes them ideal for collecting and storing water.

Many previous studies have successfully used MOF to absorb water vapor from the air and collect it into liquids for consumption. The results vary, from 100 ml of water per kilogram of MOF to more than 1.3 litres per kilogram per day. Now the new system breaks that record.

“We found that under ideal conditions, 8.66 liters of water per kilogram of MOF can be produced, which is an extraordinary discovery,” said Study on Xia Xia, co-author of the study. “

New discovery by researchers brings record amount of drinking water from thin air

To create a better version, the team looked at 10 different types of MOfs and what characteristics make them more effective. In addition, they studied how different environmental conditions, such as temperature and humidity, affected their ability to absorb water vapor.

Next, the team plans to continue looking at other types of MFOs and how to combine and configure them to find possibly more effective ways or to achieve them in dried conditions — after all, where drinking water is most needed.