Challenging the big slope: Curiosity rover returns to a batch of interesting new photos

The Curiosity rover, which is roaming on the Red Planet, has just sent back a new batch of interesting photos to NASA scientists. It presents some fascinating details on Mars, but what surprised us the most was the location and position angle of Curiosity’s shooting. NASA says the Curiosity rover can hold up to 45 degrees without dumping. However, for sound reasons, they set a threshold to avoid exceeding 30 degrees when programming.

Challenging the big slope: Curiosity rover returns to a batch of interesting new photos

(Photo from: NASA / JPL-Caltech, via Cnet)

The first is this close-up of Mars taken by Curiosity on February 1st, with a picture of a unique earth tumor with a bumpy terrain.

Curiosity captured these familiar and unfamiliar details through the MAHLI, which looks very similar to the scene taken near the end of 2019.

Challenging the big slope: Curiosity rover returns to a batch of interesting new photos

This close-up photo from January 30th looks a little more stylish.

MAHLI’s macro capability helps scientists study the details of minerals and formations on the surface of Mars. NASA calls it a magnifying glass on a Mars rover, just like the one that geologists carry with them.

NASA planetary geologist Abigail Fraeman said: ‘We were impressed by the images, but the details behind the scenes were even more amazing because Curiosity set a record for a maximum inclination of 26.9 degrees.

Challenging the big slope: Curiosity rover returns to a batch of interesting new photos

The photo taken on February 3 shows the huge inclination of Curiosity’s shooting.

NASA points out that the Curiosity rover is able to stay 45 degrees, but the safety system is programmed to avoid exceeding 30 degrees.

Of course, this is not the highest record edread ever set by a rover. Because the 2016 Sleepy Opportunity rover has reached a 32-degree inclination.