Airthena technology captures carbon dioxide directly from the air and is expected to be used to make beer.

According tomedia CNET, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising. What if people could use some of these greenhouse gases for greater benefit, such as pouring bubbles into beer? A new technology called Airthena was discussed in a press release this week by the Federal Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia’s national scientific body. “Airthena uses tiny sponges called metal-organic frame materials (MOfs) to capture carbon dioxide directly from the air and can expand commercial production,” the agency said. “

Airthena technology captures carbon dioxide directly from the air and is expected to be used to make beer.

Airthena opens up the possibility of producing carbon dioxide on a small scale in the field. This can be useful for everything from beverage carbide (beer) to greenhouse. This innovation provides a low-cost alternative to the production and transport of carbon dioxide using current methods.

But this technology will not solve our growing greenhouse gas problem. “While Airthena’s size will not have any direct impact on reducing global CO2 emissions, it will help companies use more reliable sources of gas in their day-to-day operations while reducing their carbon footprint,” CSIRO said. “

Airthena technology captures carbon dioxide directly from the air and is expected to be used to make beer.

Aaron Thornton, CSIRO’s project leader, said Airthena’s next step was to reduce the cost of small-scale equipment and test it to meet food quality standards. CSIRO is also interested in expanding the scale of technology to operate on a larger scale.

If a brewery ends up adopting Airthena, it will open up new possibilities for beer names such as Air Ale, Greenhouse Gose or Diox Dubbel.