Toxics in drinking water may accelerate tooth decay in children, study finds

Toxic chemicals common lying in drinking water may accelerate tooth decay in children, according to a new study,media reported. The researchers also found that children with higher levels of PFAS (perfluoroalkyl) in their blood also had higher tooth decay. In addition, these toxins are associated with health problems such as heart disease, cancer and the thyroid gland.

Toxics in drinking water may accelerate tooth decay in children, study finds

Researchers from the University of West Virginia studied 629 children between the ages of 3 and 11. They performed PFAS analysis of blood samples in each child in 2013 and 2014. In addition, they collected other relevant information about these children, such as how often they brush their teeth.

The results showed that Perfluorodecanoic acid was found to be associated with a large number of tooth decays in the seven PFAS substances analyzed. This substance may prevent teeth from developing normally enamel, making it more prone to decay. The good news, however, is that tooth decay is less common for children who brush their teeth at least twice a day.

In addition, PFAS was not detected in the blood of about half of the children involved in the study.