I know that after a fresh shrimp dinner, the molyth lunch will have a belly and eat only a small amount of crab

A recent team of scientists led by the University of Cambridge found that when the moths/squid knew they were going to eat shrimp for dinner, they ate a small amount of crab at noon. This expectation of the food-loving animals suggests that the brain and cognitive abilities of the cephalopods are actually complex.

I know that after a fresh shrimp dinner, the molyth lunch will have a belly and eat only a small amount of crab

Photo by Cambridge University

Sepia of the common in-the-city fish, which is very common in Europe, knows what it likes to eat, although it does know little about food. It also has a relatively complex foraging strategy, from an opportunistic strategy of opportunistic eating to a selective one, finding or waiting for preferred foods based on learning behavior.

I know that after a fresh shrimp dinner, the molyth lunch will have a belly and eat only a small amount of crab

I know that after a fresh shrimp dinner, the molyth lunch will have a belly and eat only a small amount of crab

To learn more about this, the Cambridge team fed the molyc in a different way. In one experiment, crabs were fed to tentacles during the day and shrimpweres were regularly fed at night. In the second experiment, they fed crabs during the day and shrimp at random at night. Thus, in the first experiment, the molybnos could be predicted to have shrimp for dinner, but the second random appearance could not be predicted.

According to the team, when the fish knew they were going to eat shrimp for dinner, they didn’t eat much crab during the day, but when they didn’t get their favorite meal, they ate the crabs. Not only that, but when the way feeding was changed, the molyc quickly learned and adapted.

To make sure that the fish is a lover of shrimp, keep five foods at an equal distance from dinner, 29 times a day, five times a day, and choose five crabs and shrimps, which have proved to be a favorite food for the fish.

Nicola Clayton, head of the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge, said: “This flexible foraging strategy shows that molybnos can adapt quickly to changes in their environment with previous experience. This discovery could provide valuable insights into the evolutionary origins of this complex cognitive capability. “

The study was published in the journal Biology Letters.

Source: University of Cambridge