Black fungus found inside Chernobyl nuclear reactor: ‘eat’ radiation for a living

Researchers studied a radiation-exposed black fungus found inside the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, uncovering the secrets of the magical plant. Scientists first discovered the fungus in 1991, initially confusing them, after all, in a very extreme radiation environment near nuclear reactors, but they understand that this proves that the fungus can not only resist deadly radiation, but even because of large amounts of radiation attracted.

Black fungus found inside Chernobyl nuclear reactor: 'eat' radiation for a living

Over the next decade or so, scientists gradually revealed the secrets of the fungus.

It has been found that the fungus contains a large amount of melanin, in the human body is also present under the skin, and will help absorb ultraviolet light to protect the skin, but for this fungus, melanin plays a role similar to chlorophyll, it helps the fungus absorb radiation, and it is converted into some chemical energy to help the fungus grow.

Of course, this particular ability to eat radiation is not the first of its kind, and scientists point out that a large number of highly blacked fungus spores were discovered during the Cretaceous period.

In other words, even in some extreme radiation environments, life will still exist, indicating that it is very likely that some organisms in the universe will live in a radiation-filled environment.