Scientists develop prototype of automatic blood-pumping robot, promising to save medical staff a lot of time

Robots have been used for research on the International Space Station, cleaning homes, hotel work, caring for the elderly and acting as museum “guides,” according tomedia CNET. And scientists at Rutgers University in the United States recently developed a prototype robot that can draw blood from human patients and is expected to be used in hospitals and clinics.

Scientists develop prototype of automatic blood-pumping robot, promising to save medical staff a lot of time

The university said in a statement Wednesday that the automated blood-collection robot, created by researchers at Rutgers University, is doing well and may in some cases be better than human medical professionals on the same mission.

The first human clinical trial of a blood-pumping robot has shown that it can free up time for nurses and doctors to spend more time treating patients. Ultrasound images guide the robot to find the veins, pierce them with needles, and then draw blood. The robot also includes a centrifuge-based blood analyzer. The results, published in the journal Technology, showed that the robotic device “had an overall success rate of 87 percent for the 31 participants who drew blood.” For those with 25 veins, the success rate was 97%. “

The university said previous studies had shown that health care workers had a 73 percent success rate in patients without visible veins, 60 percent in patients without visible veins, and 40 percent in patients who lost weight.

“Devices like ours can help clinicians quickly, safely, and reliably obtain blood samples, avoiding unnecessary complications and pain caused to patients with multiple needles,” study lead author and doctoral student Josh Leipheimer said in a statement. “

In the future, the university says the device could also be used in other common medical procedures, such as venous catheters and dialysis.