Computer simulation reveals the existence of new quasi-particles

Scientists in Vienna have discovered a new “quasi-particle” using computer simulations and named it a “pie” (pi-ton), according to a recent report by the PhysicistS Network. It consists of two electrons and two holes. The latest discovery will help scientists better understand the coupling between light and solids and promote development in areas such as basic research, semiconductor technology and photovoltaic technology.

Computer simulation reveals the existence of new quasi-particles

“quasi-particles” are excitations within a system that contain many particles, and they behave in many ways in the same way as individual particles. “The simplest quasi-particle is a hole, ” says Carsten Holder, a professor at the Institute of Solid Physics at the Technical University of Vienna. “But there are more complex quasi-particles in nature, such as extrepers. The stimulator is a bondage state consisting of an electron and a hole, produced by light, and plays an important role in the field of semiconductor physics.

In this study, scientists developed computer programs to calculate quantum physics effects in solids. In the simulation, they accidentally “stothened” the new quasi-particles. It consists of two electrons and two holes, which are coupled together by photons.

The two electrons and two holes of the new quasi-particle are tightly bound together by charge density fluctuations (or spin fluctuations), from one lattice point to the next, which always flip the properties of electrons and holes by 180 degrees, i.e. in arcs, and flip an angle. This fixed change from positive to negative is like a change from black to white on a chess board. So the team named the quasiparticle “pies.”

“We studied the ‘pie’ phenomenon with various models, which recur, ” the researchers said. Therefore, we can certainly detect them in a variety of different materials. Some of the experimental data obtained from experiments using titanium-thyric acid material seem to provide clues to the existence of ‘pies’, and other experiments with photons and neutrons should soon be able to get everything ‘falling out’. “

They believe the latest discovery will help scientists better understand the coupling between light and solids, which not only plays an important role in basic research, but also in the fields of semiconductors, photovoltaics and other technologies.