Researchers use bioyarn to compile blood vessels: no risk of rejection by the immune system

When it is necessary to replace damaged blood vessels, it is important for the body to have a good tolerance for the replaced blood vessels,media reported. Although bioprinting of blood vessels is a viable option, French scientists are currently studying the use of collagen yarn to weave blood vessels.

Researchers use bioyarn to compile blood vessels: no risk of rejection by the immune system

A team led by Inserm researcher Nicolas L’Heureux first developed human cells in the lab and then used it to produce extracellular matrix deposits rich in collagen. Extracellular matrixises are three-dimensional networks of macromolecules around body cells, and gas helps maintain the structural and biochemical support of these cells.

They then cut the lab-grown substrate deposit flakes into very thin fibrous strips to form yarns. These yarns can be constantly compiled and have been used to make vascular grafts. These grafts will have super clinically required burst pressure, stitch retention strength, and wall penetration.

Researchers use bioyarn to compile blood vessels: no risk of rejection by the immune system

Since the composition of collagen does not vary from individual to individual, this means that this yarn does not necessarily require the patient’s own cells. On the contrary, a large number of patients can accept braided blood vessels made in advance by other people’s cells without risking any blood vessels being rejected by the immune system.

The researchers will conduct animal trials when the collagen fibroblasts are ready, followed by human clinical trials.