Can Washington, D.C., become the 51st state in the United States? The bill will go to the House for a vote.

Comprehensivemedia reported that the U.S. House of Representatives Oversight Committee on the 11th “Make Washington, D.C. become the 51st state of the United States” bill, after six hours of debate between the popular party and Republicans, the bill was voted on, and will be sent to the House of Representatives for a full house vote, the second since 1993.

Original title: Can Washington, D.C., become the 51st state in the United States? Bill to be sent to House vote Source: News Corp Australia

Can Washington, D.C., become the 51st state in the United States? The bill will go to the House for a vote.

The bill, which is reported lying on the block of 223 house members and all Democrats, is said to be disenfranchised by more than 700,000 residents of Washington, while Republicans who oppose it argue that Washington’s self-made state is unconstitutional.

So it may be possible to get the bill through the House, but the chances of passing the Republican-controlled Senate are low.

Carolyn B. Meloni, chairman of the oversight committee, said: “It’s not a Maloney, a co-sponsor of the bill, said Washington was wrong to pay more taxes than any of the 22 states, have a largepopulation and have a higher per capita personal income and GDP than any other state, but residents have no say in the laws that affect them.

‘Washington is not a state, it’s a city that brings together government buildings, ‘ said Representative Glenn Grothman, Republican of Wisconsin.

It is understood that making Washington, D.C., the 51st state a cliche, is a self-deprecating slogan for Washingtonians for years. Norton, a non-voting member of Congress in Washington, d.C., reintroduced the “Recognizing Washington, D.C.” Act in 2019, asking Congress to vote to make Washington the 51st state in the United States.

In fact, since Democrats regained the majority in the House, the clamour for Washington, D.C., to become a state has been growing, with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Majority Leader Harry Reid supporting Norton’s proposal and wanting to link the issue to civil rights and gain more support across the country.

The House Oversight Committee held a public hearing on the bill in September 2019, with Washington Mayor Bowser and City Council President Phil Mendelson testifying.