Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

Today, Microsoft released its first simulator for Windows 10X to give developers a first look at operating system adjustments for dual-screen devices. Microsoft hopes to get developers to optimize the app before surface Neo goes on sale at the end of the year. As a result, the simulator is still in its early stages of testing and will be polished several times before it is finalized.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

After first-hand experiencing the new Windows 10X simulator, Tom Warren, editor of themedia TheVerge, first felt like a more modern version of Windows 10, ready for the rich device form of the future.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

Windows 10X is designed for collapsible or dual-screen devices, so Microsoft has made a lot of optimizations in this area. The most notable change in the first simulator is the new Windows 10X Start menu. It no longer includes live tiles that are common on Windows 8/10 and windows Phones, and has a cleaner design.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

The Windows 10X Start menu contains fixed applications and a list of recent documents. The entire look look looks more like the current task launcher, allowing users to search for applications, documents, and even web content, which also supports basic voice input. However, Cortana’s settings were not found in Windows 10X settings.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

In addition to the new Start menu, the Experience of Windows 10X and the current Windows 10 are very much displayed. Visually, you can choose both Dark and Light modes, but the biggest change to UX in Windows 10X is the multitasking of your app.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

Unlike Windows 10 systems, you can’t let applications float anywhere on your desktop. By default, apps open on a single screen, and you can drag them onto both displays with a mouse or touch to fully stretch and span dual-screen devices.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

Microsoft also uses gestures for multitasking, some of which feel similar to gestures in Windows 10 and Windows 8. In addition to the minimal minimizes and close buttons, touch in Windows 10X can sometimes be a little less convenient.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

When it comes to gestures, you can swipe up from the bottom of the display to access the Start menu or the list of running applications on the taskbar. You can also access the updated Action Center from the taskbar, which includes quick access to settings such as volume, brightness, Bluetooth, rotation lock, etc.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

Task View, which allows you to view applications running on Windows 10X, is also updated, and you can use it to summon the app to a specific monitor. If you’re used to using the old Windows Desktop or File Explorer, it’s a shame to tell you that neither of them appears on Windows 10X. On the Windows 10X desktop you can right-click to change the screen wallpaper, and there are no application icons or documents stored here.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

Similarly, traditional File Explorer has been replaced by modern File Explorer, which will guide Windows 10X users in using the content library and support external devices for file transfer.

Still to be polished: First Windows 10X Simulator

Another new feature in Windows 10X is Wonder Bar. It can be placed above or below the hardware keyboard, or it can appear as part of the software keyboard in the operating system. It’s similar to Apple’s Touch Bar and offers a wealth of input options, such as GIFs or emojis, or even a software trackpad.

Overall, Windows 10X is still in its early days and feels like a better and modern version of Windows 10. Many of the features of Windows 10X need to be further tweaked and polished, but the overall experience is still close to Windows 10.