Airbus showcases wing body fusion ‘MAVERIC’ validator hoping to change passenger plane’s design

According tomedia CNET, the basic shape of the aircraft has not changed fundamentally since commercial flights began. And at Tuesday’s Singapore Air Show, Airbus unveiled the design of a wing-body fusion aircraft that it says will eventually be used for commercial passenger services. The aircraft, known as the Ranger MAVERIC (short for the model aircraft used to validate and test innovative controls), is a verification aircraft that is only 2 meters long and 3.2 meters wide. Although the plane has been under test since June, Airbus has not made its design public until now.

Airbus showcases wing body fusion 'MAVERIC' validator hoping to change passenger plane's design

Although winged fusion aircraft are similar to winged aircraft such as stealth bombers, there is no clear dividing line between the shape of the fuselage and wings fused together. In contrast, winged aircraft have no recognizable fuselage at all. Potential benefits of hybrid-wing aircraft include a stronger structure, lighter aircraft weight and a quieter engine. Similarly, the less resistance you get from the mixed wing shape, the higher the fuel efficiency.

Airbus showcases wing body fusion 'MAVERIC' validator hoping to change passenger plane's design

Airbus said that for passengers, a cabin more like a large room would bring “exceptionally comfortable cabin layout, allowing passengers to benefit from extra legroom and larger aisles for greater personal comfort.” “

Flight tests on the model aircraft will continue into this year, and Airbus has not said when it will be able to build the MAVERIC, which will be flown by personnel.

Airbus showcases wing body fusion 'MAVERIC' validator hoping to change passenger plane's design

Boeing has also previously partnered with NASA to build the X-48B wing body fusion aircraft, and the two will continue to work together to develop wing body fusion technology. Last year, KLM said it had partnered with Delft Polytechnic University to develop the Flying-V wing-body fusion aircraft.