WHO outbreak report: New coronavirus linked to chrysanthemum manta rays

The World Health Organization has issued an outbreak report saying there is growing evidence that the new 2019 coronavirus is associated with other known coronaviruses that are known to be transmitted in bats, and more specifically with bat subspecies of chrysanthemum bats. Chrysanthemum manta rays are used in caves in small numbers, in common with other bats, and generally remain on the edge of the cave or near the top of the rock at the mouth of the cave, and are widely found in southern China and throughout Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Europe.

The latest research shows that more than 500 coronaviruses have been detected in bats in China, the report said. Serological studies of rural people living near the natural habitat of cave bats showed a serum-positive rate of 2.9 per cent, suggesting that human exposure to bat coronaviruses may be common.

The initial route of transmission of the outbreak remains unclear, the report said, and the most likely scenario is that some intermediate host animal transmits the virus to humans.

Previously, through molecular biology testing, South China Agricultural University revealed a positive rate of 70% of beta-coronavirus in pangolins, further isolated identification of the virus, observed the typical coronavirus particle structure under the electric mirror, and finally through the genome analysis of the virus, found that the isolated virus strains and the current infected human strains sequence similarity as up to 99 % determines that pangolinis is a possible potential host.

WHO outbreak report: New coronavirus linked to chrysanthemum manta rays