Get moving, sedentary or increase the risk of depression in teens.

A new study led by University College London has found that sitting still for long periods of time increases the risk of depression in adolescents. The team used data from 4,257 teenagers as part of a children’s cohort study at the University of Bristol in the 1990s, where they were involved in longitudinal studies from birth. The children wore accelerometers at the age of 12, 14 and 16 and tracked their movements for at least 10 hours for at least three days.

Get moving, sedentary or increase the risk of depression in teens.

Accelerometers are used to report whether a child is engaged in mild or moderate physical activity or sedentary activity, while using questionnaires to measure depressive symptoms such as low mood, decreased happiness and inattention.

The researchers found that overall force activity across the queue decreased between the ages of 12 and 16, mainly due to a decrease in light activity (from an average of 5 hours and 26 minutes to 4 hours and 5 minutes) and an increase in sedentary behavior (from an average of 7 hours 10 minutes to 8 hours and 43 minutes).

The researchers found that for every 60 minutes of sedentary behavior per day at the age of 12, 14 and 16, the depression score increased by 11.1%, 8 or 10.5 percent, respectively, by the age of 18. Those who sat for a long time in all three age groups scored 28.2 percent more on depression at age 18.

At the same time, for every hour of light physical activity per day at the age of 12, 14 and 16, depression scores decreased by 9.6%, 7.8% and 11.1%, respectively, by the age of 18.

The researchers say that everyone is advocating to promote increased exercise in young people, but we found that even mild activity can be beneficial and more easily integrated into young people’s daily lives, so we should pay more attention to similar activities.