Scientists say massive melting of Antarctic glaciers could happen again

Rising ocean temperatures have contributed to the melting of the Antarctic ice sheet and caused an extreme rise in sea levels more than 100,000 years ago, according to a new study by the University of New South Wales in Sydney. The team says the massive melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet is a major cause of sea level rise, known as the last interglacial period.

Scientists say extreme melting of ice is causing average sea levels to rise by several meters worldwide. According to the study, the ocean temperature required for melting ice will rise by only 2 degrees Celsius. The team says the tiny layers of ancient ash in the ice could help determine when the ice melted. The results show that the vast majority of ice loss occurred in thousands of years. The results show that most of the ice loss occurred during the first millennium.

Scientists worry that as ocean temperatures rise, ice has begun to melt, and such large-scale melting could happen again. During the last inter-ice period, polar temperatures may be 2 degrees Celsius above current levels, and this is an important time to study how future global warming will affect the ice and sea levels.

This study suggests that in a warm world, we may lose most of the Antarctic ice sheet. Most of the ice sheet is surrounded by larger floating ice, which protects the central ice sheet. As warm water enters the cavity below the ice shelf, the ice melts from below and thins the shelf layer, making the central ice sheet vulnerable to rising ocean temperatures.

Scientists say massive melting of Antarctic glaciers could happen again