Fairy jellyfish spray spraying venom shells can create a tingling sensation in the surrounding water

Cassiopea xamachana, perched on the surface of a patch of water, looks like plant life from another world, according tomedia. Their colors range from light white to dark blue — they are beautiful and may even be harmless to the average passer-by, but they have a secret weapon — a spore-like thing that can shock nearby creatures like an invisible bomb.

Fairy jellyfish spray spraying venom shells can create a tingling sensation in the surrounding water

Fairy jellyfish can reach 1 foot and 2 inches in height, respectively. The jellyfish live in tropical waters off the indo-Pacific coast, the southern coast of Florida, Hawaii and the Caribbean.

Fairy jellyfish spray spraying venom shells can create a tingling sensation in the surrounding water

The creature uses its own bell-shaped suction cup to fix it at the bottom of the sea. What’s special about this jellyfish is that it’s upside down, and it can photosynthesis with symbiotic algae that live in it. These tiny single-cell whiplash algae — also known as algae or insect jaundice — convert energy from the sun into jellyfish food.

But what about the stingy water squiling around these jellyfish during field research? Cheryl L. Ames et al. said in the newly published summary of the study: “In mangrove waters, there is a feeling of what is known as ‘stinging water’, in which divers feel uncomfortable, but the reason is unclear. “

“Combining histology, microscopy, microfluidics, imaging, molecular biology, and mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we draw the hedgehog structure of fairy jellyfish, which we call cassiosomes. “

Fairy jellyfish spray spraying venom shells can create a tingling sensation in the surrounding water

This cassiosomes has two layers of structure, in which epithelial cells are mainly composed of nematodes, and the inner core is filled by the host in the amoeba cells and the presumed symbiotic whiplash in the line.

Studies have shown that small amounts of fairy jellyfish do not cause particular harm to the human body. During the study, these jellyfish were observed to release large amounts of venom-containing mucus into the water when the surrounding water was disturbed.