Study finds vitamin E to treat fatty liver safety and effectiveness in AIDS patients

A study led by McGill University in Canada found that vitamin E can be safe and effective in treating fatty liver disease in AIDS patients. Non-alcoholic fatty hepatitis (NASH) is a severe non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) characterized by liver inflammation and cell damage, a potentially dangerous disease that can develop into cirrhosis or liver cancer.

Study finds vitamin E to treat fatty liver safety and effectiveness in AIDS patients

In Canada, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects up to 48% of AIDS patients and 25% of the general population, and one-third of non-alcoholic fatty hepatitis patients who are not alcoholic fatty liver disease.

In the study, 27 HIV carriers and non-alcoholic fatty hepatitis patients received vitamin E treatment at two pills per day, which was easy to tolerate. Noninvasive ultrasound tests have found that vitamin E improves liver transaminase (the main blood test for liver function) and liver fat.

The researchers said the treatment for vitamin E in these populations was surprisingly effective, even better than in those who were not infected with HIV. Therefore, vitamin E may be an effective treatment for non-alcoholic fatty hepatitis in people living with HIV.

The researchers also stressed that since the study did not have a control group, the study group was small and had a shorter follow-up time (24 weeks). Therefore, the next step is to conduct a larger randomized controlled trial to lead to better treatments and treatments.