Finely adjust or affect the ability of an airliner to produce condensed tails, thereby reducing its environmental impact

When it comes to vehicles that have a serious impact on the environment, we all think of fuel cars and trucks immediately, but passenger planes can also have a significant impact on the environment,media BGR reported. One way jetliners affect the earth is to produce sparse white lines called “condensed tails” (or aircraft clouds), which we often see appear in the sky. Now, a new study working to reduce the environmental impact of such aircraft suggests that small changes could have a huge positive impact, reducing the damage caused by passenger aircraft.

Finely adjust or affect the ability of an airliner to produce condensed tails, thereby reducing its environmental impact

You may not imagine that condensation may have a big impact on the Earth, but science is the opposite. Condensation trail is the phenomenon of water vapor condensation produced by the mixture of exhaust gas after the combustion of aircraft fuel and the surrounding cold and wet air, and remains suspended for a considerable period of time.

Like man-made clouds, they block sunlight from entering the ground, but also act as insulators, capturing heat that would otherwise dissipate into space. If a flight method can be found along the same route that does not produce these traces, the environment will benefit, and the researchers believe they can solve the problem.

In the new study, published in Environmental Science and Technology, researchers believe that subtle adjustments in the height of commercial airliners could greatly affect their ability to produce condensed tails. If the resulting trajectory is converted to a higher or lower flight, the production trajectory conversion may be stopped immediately. In fact, only a few thousand feet of altitude changes can work.

Finely adjust or affect the ability of an airliner to produce condensed tails, thereby reducing its environmental impact

The best part is that not all flights will be affected by this change. As CNN reported, only about 2 percent of scheduled flights need to be adjusted to significantly curb the environmental impact of commercial air travel.

While such a change may complicate the work of air traffic controllers to some extent, and new technologies may need to be developed to detect and air conditions so that pilots know where they can fly to avoid condensation tails, the benefits can be enormous.