New study shows some dinosaurs are not cold-blooded

Are dinosaurs cold-blooded or warm-blooded? The scientific community has long had different views on this issue. Some dinosaurs had temperatures between 35 and 40 degrees Celsius, suggesting they were not cold-blooded but warm-blooded, according to a new study.

New study shows some dinosaurs are not cold-blooded

In a paper published in the new issue of the journal Scientific Progress, researchers at the Hebrew University of Israel and others say they studied three dinosaur egg fossils found in Canada and elsewhere, inferring the dinosaur’s body temperature by analyzing the isotope characteristics of calcium carbonate minerals in eggshells. The results showed that the dinosaurs had a temperature of between 35 and 40 degrees Celsius, about the same as today’s humans.

New study shows some dinosaurs are not cold-blooded

So, was the environment so warm at the time, or did the dinosaurs maintain the above body temperature on their own? The researchers also analyzed fossils of cold-blooded molluscs living in the same area as the dinosaurs at the same time, and concluded that some molluscs had a temperature of about 26 degrees Celsius, reflecting the temperature of the environment at the time.

The researchers therefore believe that these dinosaurs are not cold-blooded animals whose body temperature changes with the ambient temperature, but rather warm-blooded animals that maintain their body temperature on their own metabolism.