MIT new system predicts best way to shift asteroids that will hit Earth

So far, the Earth has not experienced an asteroid collision that poses a direct threat to it — at least no one knows, according tomedia. Now scientists expect an attempted event to occur by 2029. So it’s necessary for us to be ready for humanity, so researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a system that can help determine the best way to avoid collisions.

MIT new system predicts best way to shift asteroids that will hit Earth

The MIT team, led by former MIT graduate student Sung Wook Paek, presented a “decision map” in a newly published study that would approach the asteroid’s mass and relative momentum, as well as the gravitational halo around the earth, as people enter the so-called “keyhole” of the asteroid. Once in, it is almost guaranteed that the asteroid will collide with the planet — before the expected time.

The decision chart developed by MIT offers three different options for how to deflect a nearby asteroid: launching projectiles to asteroids to change its course; sending scouts to obtain accurate measurements to inform them of the best development of the projectiles; and sending two more scouts to obtain measurements and possibly pushing the object by pushing them. Then it is set to make it easier to fight back based on projectiles.

Time became a key factor in the model, based on simulations using asteroids Apophis and Bennu. The two known objects, Apophis and Bennus, are relatively familiar with each other, including the location of gravitational pores and the distance between the Earth. Tests have shown that the best way to do this in five years or more is to send two scouts before firing projectiles, and between two and five years, a scout and then projectiles will need to be sent if they are to succeed;