Study reveals link between oral hygiene and cardiovascular disease Cleanliness helps reduce inflammation

For decades, researchers have been trying to determine a link between poor oral hygiene practices and symptoms such as cardiovascular disease, stroke and high blood pressure. A new study published in the American Medical Journal recently revealed a fascinating link between oral hygiene and cardiovascular disease. Although this link is not mutual cause and effect, it indicates common diseases that some lifestyles may cause.

Study reveals link between oral hygiene and cardiovascular disease Cleanliness helps reduce inflammation

(From: Plaque HD)

A randomized pilot trial at Florida Atlantic University (FAU) found that using toothpaste specifically for plaque can reduce levels of systemic inflammation in the body by improving the efficiency of brushing.

Some researchers believe that periodontal disease may be a sign of poor health and hygiene behavior, and that subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease (which is supposed to increase systemic inflammation) increases.

As an effective biomarker of systemic inflammation in the human body, C-reactive protein (CRP) is positively correlated, and high CRP levels are considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

In addition, studies have shown that periodontal disease can lead to elevated CRP levels. Based on this, the researchers came up with a hypothesis that linked oral disease to increased levels of inflammation in the body.

Study reveals link between oral hygiene and cardiovascular disease Cleanliness helps reduce inflammation

(From: Plaque HD)

The new study, published in the American Medical Journal, explores how much a toothpaste (Plaque HD) that is specifically targeted at plaque sparing lyngnisors can do to lower CRP levels compared to conventional toothpaste.

Toothpaste manufacturers claim that PlaqueHD has twice the efficiency of tooth plaque removal, which is the main reason researchers chose it for the experiment. About 100 subjects were recruited in the trial and randomly divided into two groups.

One group used 30 days and the other 30 days with a placebo, and then assessed the CRP level at the beginning and end of the trial.

The results showed that the experimental group was more effective at reducing CRP levels than the control group, but only in patients who had shown high levels of systemic inflammation.

As to whether such toothpaste can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke, senior study author Charles Hennekens believes further research is needed.