Scientists develop infection detection kits to detect bacteria and indicate which antibiotics to use

Treatment for the infection can be challenging because it will take some time to determine whether or not there is even harmful bacteria before deciding which antibiotic is most effective,media New Atlas reported. However, it is reported that there is now a simple new test kit that can answer both questions on the spot. Typically, a blood or urine sample of the patient must be sent to the laboratory for analysis. Results usually take several days to get results – and doctors may use broad-spectrum antibiotics. Such drugs are less effective than those that target specific bacteria that cause infections, and overuse can lead to the production of drug-resistant bacteria.

Scientists develop infection detection kits to detect bacteria and indicate which antibiotics to use

With these shortcomings in mind, a team at the University of Southampton in the UK developed this new, inexpensive one-off device. The device consists of three layers of laser cutting: the top layer contains four commonantibiotics in four small rectangular areas, the middle layer is made of absorbent paper, and the bottom layer is made of agar bacteria culture gel. Everything is sealed in a plastic box.

The user first applies the patient’s biofluid sample to the feed port of the device and then covers it with tape to prevent it from drying out or contaminating. The liquid begins to seep into the paper, coming into contact with all four antibiotic rectangles.

Scientists develop infection detection kits to detect bacteria and indicate which antibiotics to use

If harmful bacteria are present in the sample, the paper will turn blue. That is, there will be about any explicit non-blue-spotted bacteria that contain antibiotics for the effective rectangle. If the paper is blue but does not have clear spots, it means that another antibiotic is needed. When the device was used to analyze artificial urine mixed with E. coli, it was found to be as reliable as traditional laboratory tests conducted in a petri dish.

Lead scientist Dr Collin Sones said: “By enabling doctors to quickly determine whether an infection is caused by a bacterium and whether the bacteria are resistant to four common antibiotics, the device can reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions and help combat the growing threat of antibiotic resistance.” “

Scientists recently published a paper on the study in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics.