Game therapy helps treat ADHD, new study shows

Video games have been around since then, and there has been much research on whether playing games is harmful to human health, and whether games cause violence among children and young people. But a new study has found that game therapy may help people with ADHD.

Game therapy helps treat ADHD, new study shows

The study was conducted by A D.K. Clinical Research Institute, which divided 350 children with ADHD ages 8-12 into two groups, one assigned to play regular games and the other to play games for the treatment of ADHD. Children play their own games for 25 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. None of the children in the study had used prescription or other forms of ADHD drugs.

Four weeks later, the study found that children who received game therapy performed better than the control group on attention span-related tests. Previously, games were often used as scapegoats for violence, and some even blamed the game for mass shootings.

Previous studies have also found that game therapy can also help people with both mental and physical illnesses. A recent study found that VR could help treat patients with traumatic brain injury. Duke University’s study of game therapy for ADHD does not suggest that game therapy can be an alternative to traditional methods, but the medical benefits of the game may not be fully valued and may be further studied in the future.