Time goes by faster, scientists find that early risers have only 20 hours of biological clock.

Everyone’s sleep habits are different, some people like to get up early and go to bed early, some people are night owls, at two or three o’clock at night is still awake. What makes the difference? Scientists in the United States have found that early risers pass their time faster, with their biological clocks about 20 hours instead of 24 hours.

Time goes by faster, scientists find that early risers have only 20 hours of biological clock.

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A study they funded revealed the biological clock problems of people with different sleep habits, said Carrie Partch of the University of California, Santa Cruz, and colleagues at the National University of California, New Gabor duke School of Medicine and the University of California, San Diego.

They found that the body’s biological clock is made up of specialized proteins that interact with each other in a specific way, regulating 15 percent of the genome within 24 hours.

In Carrie Partch et al.’s paper, they found that two substances are at the heart of the affecting biological clock, CK1 (casein kinase 1) and the PERIOD protein, two kinds of ignorance that have affected the biological clock for many years, as confirmed more than 20 years ago.

But Carrie Partch’s research focuses on solving a fundamental question – why does it take 24 hours to regulate the biological clock? To do a series of studies, she and her team found that CK1 is a regulatory switch, which works with a biological clock cycle of almost perfect 24 hours.

If CK1 changes, more conducive to degradation, then the body’s biological clock will be shortened, people are prone to get up early.

Conversely, if CK1 slows down, the speed of the adjustment switch is slower, the biological clock will be longer and people will become night owls more likely.