Scientists have found a more effective way to produce hydrogen from organic waste

While most people think of electric cars when considering zero-emission scarlet driving, vehicles powered by hydrogen fuel cells are another option, but the challenge now is hydrogen fuel infrastructure and hydrogen production. Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a new technique that uses rust and light to accelerate organic waste solutions to make hydrogen.

The researchers believe the findings could revolutionize the clean energy industry. New research shows that under the same light, alpha-FeOOH rust and Hg-Xe lamps can be a more efficient hydrogen catalyst than titanium dioxide, increasing efficiency by 25 times. A key issue that must be addressed in this process is the prevention of hydrogen and oxygen reconnection, which poses a potential hazard once hydrogen is manufactured. The team was surprised to use rust as a catalyst to produce hydrogen. According to one researcher, most iron oxides do not reduce hydrogen.

The team found that alpha-FeOOH is activated by oxygen, another surprising phenomenon, as previous studies have shown that oxygen suppresses hydrogen production by capturing excitation electrons. In tests, light and rust are combined in the process to produce stable hydrogen for more than 400 hours. The team intends to continue to study the process, and the exact process of oxygen activation of alpha-FeOOH remains unknown. The team’s next challenge is to explore this mechanism. It is hoped that this sound process will contribute to zero emissions through sustainable energy.

Scientists have found a more effective way to produce hydrogen from organic waste