Study: Web-on-car service increases emissions, contributes to climate pollution

According tomedia reports, the non-profit advocacy group Union of Concerned Scientists released a survey on February 25th, the network car service is increasing carbon emissions, such travel methods than private car travel caused more pollution. It can also cause travellers to stay away from public transport. The study looked at the impact of online ride-on services in seven U.S. cities.

Study: Web-on-car service increases emissions, contributes to climate pollution

Study: Web-on-car service increases emissions, contributes to climate pollution

Study: Web-on-car service increases emissions, contributes to climate pollution

Study: Web-on-car service increases emissions, contributes to climate pollution

Study: Web-on-car service increases emissions, contributes to climate pollution

The report calls on companies such as Uber and Lyft to electlify their fleets, increase their share of carpooling and increase connectivity to public transport hubs.

A number of studies conducted over the past two years have found that online car services are increasing congestion in the city centre as the number of people using public transport falls and private car ownership has not declined. The study is the first to quantify the pollution caused by the network car service. The researchers found that, on average, a one-time internet-connected car service emits nearly 50 percent more carbon dioxide than a private car.

Uber did not comment on the report in its statement, but said it wanted to work with cities to address climate change. The company also said it would continue to promote carpooling, as well as other forms of transportation.

Lyft said in its statement that the report gave misleading information about the ride-sharing service and encouraged carpooling and electric vehicles.

Both companies operate their own electric scooter services and bike services, and have begun to integrate public transport information into their respective applications, as well as electricizing vehicles in some cities.

The study points out that carpooling (i.e. multiple passengers in a car) emits roughly the same amount of emissions as private cars. The study found that about 15 percent of all online car journeys in the U.S. today are carpooled.

Although the vehicles used in the network car are relatively new and provide higher fuel efficiency, the emissions are still higher than in private cars, because of the large number of empty driving times per day. On average, the amount of time spent waiting and getting to the passenger’s pick-up point accounts for about 42 per cent of all the activity time of the network’s approximate lym. The study also found that net cars emit nearly 70 percent more emissions than buses, subways, bicycles and walking.

Uber and Lyft have previously said similar studies have been amplifying the impact of internet cars, and that most of the emissions actually come from private cars and commercial vehicles.