Satellite monitoring data show a sharp decrease in nitrogen dioxide emissions during the epidemic

Satellite imagery from nasa in the United States and Europe showed that pollution levels across the country have fallen sharply as the coVID-19 outbreak caused by the new coronavirus has been severely combated everywhere. Comparing the nitrogen dioxide monitoring data before and after the event, we can see how the gas, which is mainly released by fuel combustion, dissipates. For example, from January 1 steil to February 25 last year, nitrogen dioxide levels in Wuhan showed hot coverage, with higher concentrations of pollutants in the crimson section.

Satellite monitoring data show a sharp decrease in nitrogen dioxide emissions during the epidemic

Over the same period this year, however, nitrogen dioxide levels in the region showed significant differences — almost all regions showed lower concentrations of blue.

Scientists point out that while pollution levels at the Lunar New Year flagship usually decline, this year’s results are quite different.

‘This is the first time it has seen a particular event, and there has been such a huge drop in such a wide range,’ Fei Liu, an air quality researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said in a statement.

Pollutant emissions showed a more sharp decline during the COVID-19 epidemic than observed during the 2008 recession, and lasted more than beijing during the Olympics.

Satellite monitoring data show a sharp decrease in nitrogen dioxide emissions during the epidemic

Liu said he wasn’t surprised because a large number of cities across the country have taken aggressive steps to reduce the spread of the virus since the first report ingress in December.

It is reported that nitrogen dioxide will react with other substances in the air, resulting in smoke and acid rain and other damage to the environment and pollution.

But on the other hand, this “home-to-home” campaign to combat the outbreak does reduce respiratory discomfort that can result from nitrogen dioxide emissions.