Nuclear physicists have come up with a new type of dark matter candidate particle

Dark Matter is a mysterious substance that is abundant in the universe and is thought to be five to one in proportion to conventional matter,media New Atlas reported. But so far, dark matter has never been directly detected. Now, nuclear physicists at the University of York have come up with a new candidate particle that could make up this strange substance.

Nuclear physicists have come up with a new type of dark matter candidate particle

Nearly a century of observation and calculation by scientists tells us that the matter that exists in the universe far exceeds what we see. This unknown substance seems to interact only with conventional matter through gravity and does not emit, absorb or reflect any light – thus earning the nickname of dark matter.

For decades, it remains a mystery what constitutes dark matter, but physicists have proposed many candidate particles. The recommendations include axes, dark photons, weakly interacting large mass particles (WIMP), overweight gravinoms, “macro” particles of dwarf planet mass, and marker particles that may be older than the Big Bang.

Nuclear physicists have come up with a new type of dark matter candidate particle

But the truth is that all of these particles are hypothetical, and despite extensive experiments, their existence has not yet been confirmed. That’s what makes the new hypothesis so appealing – the new proposed candidate particle has been discovered.

The particle, technically known as d s (2380), was discovered in an experiment in 2014. Typically, protons and neutrons consist of three quarks (elementary particles). The particle contains a collection of six quarks. This makes d s (2380) a boson, and under certain conditions they come together in unusual ways. For example, when cooled to near absolute zero, they form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), in which particles begin to function like a large “superatom”.

Nuclear physicists have come up with a new type of dark matter candidate particle

According to the new hypothesis, this may be an explanation for dark matter. Physicists at the University of York believe that shortly after the Big Bang, dd s (2380) could gather as Bose-Einstein condensed, enough to produce the effects of dark matter.

Daniel Watts, co-author of the study, said: “Our preliminary calculations suggest that the condensation of d (2380) is a possible new candidate for dark matter. This new result is particularly exciting because it does not require any new physical concepts. “Of course, the idea is still hypothetical at this stage and requires further study. The researchers plan to test their theory in the lab and begin looking for signals in the sky.

Nuclear physicists have come up with a new type of dark matter candidate particle

“The next step in building this new dark matter candidate will be to better understand the interactions between d stars – when they attract each other and when they are mutually exclusive,” said study co-author Mikhail Bashkanov. We are leading new measurements to create d-stars within the nucleus and to see if their properties are different from when they were in free space. “

The study was published in the journal Proceedings Letters.