Women also top half of the sky: gender equality has a significant impact on longevity

On March 6th, according tomedia reports, a new study published in the Lancet journal EClinicalMedicine by the Center for World Policy Analysis at the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles, shows that people in countries with lower rates of gender equality live longer.

Women also top half of the sky: gender equality has a significant impact on longevity

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In particular, in countries with high levels of gender parity in educational opportunities, life expectancy for both men and women is longer and the number of deaths per 100,000 live births is significantly reduced. At the same time, the increase in gender parity in the workplace has been linked to a reduction in maternal mortality and a significant increase in female life expectancy throughout the country.

The researchers point out that, after calculating the gross domestic product, unemployment, urbanization and domestic government health expenditures in each country, if the gender parity index for educational opportunities increased by 10%, the annual total enrolment in primary and secondary education in a country increased by 4.9%, which is a two-year increase in female life expectancy. The increase in life expectancy at birth for men is associated with an increase of nearly one year.

At the same time, gender parity in education opportunities in a country has also increased by 10 per cent, which is also associated with a reduction of nearly 60 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births nationwide.

In addition, if the female labour force participation rate increases by 10 per cent, the number of deaths per 100,000 live births is reduced by 15, and the life expectancy of women at birth is extended by almost a full year, with no effect on male life expectancy.

Increased women’s participation in society as a whole, in addition to reducing poverty and promoting human rights, can have a broad and positive impact on population health, and both men and women can benefit from this shift, the researchers said.