Google location data makes cyclists mistaken for burglary suspects

According to NBC News, U.S. police named a Florida man as a suspect in a burglary case when they used a geofence feature to collect information about nearby devices, according to the bike track on the Fitness APP.

But at the time of the burglary, the suspect, Zachary McCoy, did not pass or appear at the scene. But on the day of the burglary, mcCoy recorded him pass the crime scene three times, according to the RunKeeper app used by McCoy, so he was listed by police as a suspect.

Google location data makes cyclists mistaken for burglary suspects

NBC News said Google’s legal investigation team contacted McCoy in January to inform him that Gainesville police were asking him to provide information about his Google account. He was eventually approved as a suspect, but was not released until he hired a lawyer to help him figure out what the police were looking for.

Geofencing, a search warrant, requires Google to provide data on any device , including location, that it records near the site of a burglary. This data is usually from Android Location Services;